Tagged Ink Samples

Surviving Winter With Iroshizuku

In Winter, wear all your jewel tones. Bedazzle your wardrobe. Indulgent purchases often come in bright colors: candy, makeup, ink— it’s all the glittery and delicious accessories that we use to decorate our lives.

I’m embarrassingly late to even trying Iroshizuku inks, though they’ve been out for a couple years now. But, damn. That price tag. (Which, by the way: does anyone want to split a bottle with me? Shoot me an email if you’re interested.)

Iroshizuku Inks on Rhodia

This is me caught in a moment of design rapture regarding Iroshizuku bottles. Office Supply Geek also has a great top view.

Iroshizuku Inks on Rhodia

This is me throwing some Rhodia pride out into the world, scribbling Pilot/Iroshizuku’s Yama-Budo, Yama-Guri, Tsutsuji, Tsuyo-Kusa, Tsuki-yo, Ku-Jaku, Syo-ro and Platinum’s Carbon Black.

Or, alternately: Crimson Glory Vine, Wild Chestnut, Azalea, Asiatic Dayflower, Moonlight, Peacock, Dew on Pine Tree, and Platinum’s Carbon Black.

Iroshizuku Blue Green Comparison

The turquoises are a bit hard to distinguish, and I’m fairly sure that buying both Ku-Jaku (2nd up from Carbon Black) and Syo-Ro (directly above Carbon Black) would be a waste of money.

All my samples came from Goulet Pen Company during their ink samples sale earlier this month.

Autumn Ink Reviews

I’ll tell you one thing that  I miss about the east coast: a real Autumn. Colorado definitely has a “transitional period” of some kind, but it’s kind of spazzy, weather-wise. Although I’m missing the golds and reds and oranges of home, the one highlight in Colorado is the bright yellow wash of Aspens in Fall.

I embraced the season instead by ordering some autumn ink samples from Pear Tree Pens. (A good excuse, right?) I can honestly say that I’ve never ordered anything from Pear Tree Pens except for their ink samples– they should play it up more. Like: I wish I could get larger-sized samples. Sometimes it’s difficult to suck anything up out of those tiny jars, especially with a larger nib.

I also wish I could get samples of the forebodingly-priced Iroshizuku inks… anybody want to split a bottle with me?

Above, the samples are: Noodler’s Cayenne, Noodler’s Habanero, Noodler’s Apache Sunset, Rohrer & Klingner Goldgrun (with J. Herbin’s Vert Olive for comparison), Noodler’s Zhivago, Noodler’s Burma Road Brown (V-mail series), and Rohrer & Klingner Solferino

They were tested with two dip pens (an italic and a flex), which isn’t going to match how they’ll look in a regular fountain pen. I also got a sample of Noodler’s Bulletproof Black which is not shown above, and Vert Olive is there only for comparison.

Here’s the overview

Noodler’s Bulletproof Black. Tested in TWSBI Diamond, F nib. I’m pretty devoted to Aurora Black, but I needed a waterproof black ink and this one seems to be the standard. I can see more shading than with other black inks, but I also noticed that it’s the only ink that doesn’t feather on regular paper. I’ve used it in the office Moleskines and in my new leather-covered sketchbook with absorbent art paper, with no feathering or bleedthrough. Haven’t tested the waterproof-ness yet, so I’m planning a full review later.

Rohrer & Klingner Goldgrun. Tested in Pelikan M400, F flexible nib. I don’t know if I can say much about its behavior, because my Pelikan’s flex nib is very wet writer, which throws off the test. The color is a perfect match to the White tortoise exterior, though…

Goldgrun (top) compared to Vert Olive (bottom)

Goldgrun is much more subtle and muted than J. Herbin’s Vert Olive, which appears almost lime in comparison.

Noodler’s Apache Sunset. Tested in a Parker 45, M stub nib and Parker Vector, F nib. Ah yes, one of many ethnically-named inks which rely on our cultural stereotypes of color-associations. Juuuust sayin’. Nonetheless, word on the street is that Apache Sunset has some of the best shading around. Which is why I tested it in two pens, though I still think I’m not really highlighting its shading capacities. I wish I had a Pilot Parallel…

But you can still see the variation even in these two pens: the Vector, which is a much dryer writer, and the Parker 45 stub nib.

Noodler’s Habanero. Tested in Aurora Ipsilon, F nib. I’ve actually tried this ink before; I just wanted to compare it to Cayenne and Apache Sunset. It’s a beautiful bright orange with good wet flow and is more opaque than other oranges, like Herbin’s Orange Indien. It has excellent shading, although it’s hard to see in my Aurora’s fine nib.

Noodler’s Cayenne. For whatever reason I didn’t fill up a pen with this color! So, um, raincheck?

Noodler’s Zhivago. Tested in Lamy 2000, F nib, and Pilot 78G, B italic nib. A lot of people complained that you can barely distinguish Zhivago from plain old black, and  this is generally true for fine nibs. In my Lamy 2000 F nib, the subtle variations in shading can only be seen close up (I’m interested to try it in a dry writing fine nib, though; because the wet-writing Lamy 2000 makes many inks appear darker). However, this well-flowing ink is pretty damn smashing in my Pilot’s B italic nib. It’s like a black, but a black with character. Click on the image below to view the shading full-size. And I love  beautiful subdued colors like this one: a mossy green almost-black.

Noodler’s Burma Road Brown (V-mail series). Tested in Lamy Safari, EF nib. Another lively neutral color, Burma Road Brown is a dark sandy brown, like very faded letter. With regards to ink behavior, my first impression was that, hey, this ink is, um, really different from other inks. The first clue: it actually bled through Clairefontaine paper. (Wha..?) So then I tried it on regular crappy paper, and… zero bleedthrough. And zero feathering. Even in a Moleskine. (Wha…?) …Okay, there was bleedthrough in the Moleskine. But no feathering! Which is a pretty huge accomplishment. Like Bulletproof Black, I’m going to follow this up with a full review.

Rohrer & Klingner Solferino. Tested in a Lamy Al-Star, 1.1 italic nib. And thus we move from subtle neutrals to, um, blinding neon purple. Granted, Solferino becomes slightly less vivid after it dries, but only slightly. But I’m pretty fond of this color already: it’s great for calling attention to things in my planner, and it matches Daniel Smith’s Quinacridone Violet, which I think is pretty cool.